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Heartworm Prevention

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Heartworm Prevention
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When mosquitoes bite, they can also transmit heartworm infection, and those heartworms can wreak havoc on your dog or cat. These internal parasites can severely and sometimes fatally damage the heart, lungs, and blood vessels. Some pets may not show any outward signs of infection, and in those that do, symptoms can vary widely.

In dogs, signs of heartworm disease can range from coughing, fatigue, and unexplained weight loss to difficulty breathing and a swollen abdomen (caused by fluid accumulation from heart failure). Canine heartworm infection can also lead to a life-threatening complication called “caval syndrome” (a form of liver failure). Without prompt surgical intervention, this condition usually results in death.

Although often thought to not be susceptible to heartworm infection, cats can indeed get heartworms. Specifically, felines can suffer from a syndrome referred to as heartworm-associated respiratory disease (HARD), the symptoms of which can be subtle and may mimic those of asthma or allergic bronchitis. Signs of respiratory distress, such as rapid or difficulty breathing, wheezing, and panting, are common. Other symptoms include coughing, vomiting (typically unrelated to eating), and unexplained loss of appetite or weight. Heartworm infection is more difficult to diagnose in cats than it is in dogs.

Treating heartworm infection is far more expensive than preventing it—and doing so can actually be fatal in dogs. There is currently no approved treatment for cats. While some cats may spontaneously rid themselves of the infection, others sadly might not survive it. Furthermore, even one or two adult heartworms in a cat can cause serious problems.

Fortunately, there’s a way to keep your dog or cat safe: by administering monthly heartworm preventives. Most heartworm medications also protect your pet against other dangerous parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, ear mites, fleas, and ticks. The seasoned team at Huron East Animal Hospital will gladly recommend a regimen of prevention for your pet.

Huron East Animal Hospital

A4-1606 Battler Rd
Kitchener, Ontario N2R 0C9

t: 519-895-8883
f: 519-895-8886

Business Hours

Mon – Fri: 8am – 6pm
Saturday: 8am – 5pm
Sunday: Closed

Huron East Animal Hospital is LGBTQIA+ Friendly
Justin To
Justin To
13:26 18 Oct 22
I brought my rabbit Wanda to Huron East Animal Hospital for an emergency situation. All the staff were friendly, helpful and concerned about Wanda's situation. They were able to book Wanda in quickly for an emergency appointment.Wanda was treated with the utmost care and expertise you could hope... for. They asked many questions, examined Wanda and came up with a treatment plan, giving me options and pricing, so there was no surprise at the end. The prices for this emergency situation were very reasonable.Dr. Johnson answered all my questions and quelled my concerns, with genuine care for Wanda's health and professional advise. Dr. Johnson even drew me a detailed diagram to help explain the situation. Beyond me being put at ease by the entire staff at Huron East Animal Hospital, Wanda was completely calm while being handled the staff and Dr. Johnson. I think Wanda enjoyed her trip to the vet! The clinic even called me a couple of days later to check and see if Wanda's health was improving, which I thought was such a professional courtesy.I really couldn't have asked for more while going through a rough situation with Wanda. If you are looking for a great team to help your pet with ongoing and emergency care, then Huron East Animal Hospital should be your first stop.read more
Andrea C
Andrea C
19:53 10 Feb 22
Stop searching for a great vet, this is the one!! Our two pups, Fajita and Hamburger, love their visits and the staff really do care for their well-being. Always calling to check in with our two fur kiddos ❤️
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